More Praise for the Day Job

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I’ve written about day-jobbing before (here, here, here, and here, among other places) but this morning I came across something else worth sharing…

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Writers: On Picking the Right Day Job

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Last week I talked about the advantages to having a day job as a writer, and today I want to take it a step further…

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Friday Things

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Hello Friday, it’s wonderful to see you.

It’s been a week. I ultimately decided to cancel my upcoming trip to Grenada, which sucks, but we’re trying to plan something else to make up for it. My cat may be ill. I’m behind on my writing. I’m trying not to let my day job suck out my soul. Hoping this weekend will be a good time to reboot and go into next week feeling a bit more together.

Here are some interesting things I’ve found on the internets lately:

1. Famous authors had day jobs, too.

2. To me it never went away, but I loved reading about the resurgence of the greatest TV show ever.

3. Not sure I agree with the accuracy of all of these, but this was interesting.

4. This is just awesome.

5. And this is incredibly useful.

Reading: The sequel to this. It’s so good I was happy when the subway got stuck this morning because it gave me extra reading time.

Watching: This. It’s definitely not the most brilliant TV of our time, but I loved the books and am really enjoying it. (This made me laugh so hard.)

Writing: Still on my YA fantasy. Last week I made a major shift to the inciting incident–I made things much worse for my protagonist–so I’m quickly reworking some of the opening scenes before moving onto to new stuff. It’s a definite improvement. I just need a Time-Turner so I have more time to work on it.

Listening to: These guys

Lovely image found here

Writing versus Blogging—The Epic Struggle

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So when I started this blog I was actually thinking I’d be posting to it more often. All the ideas! Can’t keep up!

But you know what? There are still only twenty-four hours in a day. A day in which I need to commute to a day job, do work at said day job, get in some exercise, cook myself some food, invest some time with the people I love so they don’t write me off as an antisocial selfish misanthrope with delusional writing aspirations, shower, sleep, and oh yes, write books. (And I don’t even have children yet, but that’s a panic attack for another day.)

“If you want to be a good writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.”

So says Stephen King. Notice he does not add “blog a lot”. (Then again, “On Writing” was published in 2000, when blogging was not yet a thing.)

When I get to my writing time and the choice is between working on a blog and working on my manuscript, what do I do? I generally choose to work on my manuscript.

Another good nugget from King:

“The hours we spend talking about writing is time we don’t spend actually doing it.”

He actually advises against reading too much writing advice. (He is aware of  the irony of writing this in a writing advice book, just as I am aware of the irony of posting this in my writing advice blog.)

He’s absolutely right. There is SO MUCH writing advice out there. There are days when I get overwhelmed by it all (but wait, have I read every article on the pros and cons of first person versus third person? and do I really know every nuance of YA versus NA? And this blogger has actually published a book, clearly I must read every blog post she’s ever written!) and I’m just like, how do I INTERNET?

Then there are other days—the days when I just find the online writing community to be so incredibly valuable. From stumbling upon some really insightful or helpful post, to just knowing that there are so many other people struggling right along with me. Which is why I ultimately decided to start doing this blogging thing.

So my goal is one post a week, and if this doesn’t get me the hugest following ever, I will deal. I’d rather have a huge reader following, and I will only deserve that if I take the time to hone my craft. (And, you know, find and agent and a publisher and all that … but that’s the subject of another post).

Other bloggers, how often do you post? And how do you balance it with writing (especially if you have a day job or tiny people to look after?)

P.S. “On Writing” is one of the best books I’ve ever read. Full review coming later.